Express press service

BHUBANESWAR: The time has come for Indian stories and everyone wants to have access to them in English, author and journalist Aparna Karthikeyan said at the 10th Odisha Literary Festival here on Sunday. Join the conversation on ‘Jam Scones or Pani Puri? Do we have enough Indian tales? with poet and author Sridala Swami, Aparna said the translation scene in India is now vibrant and as a result more Indian stories are available in English. Indian stories are mostly about everyday events. “But do we have enough space to report these events in popular media?” she asked.

For Aparna, there is a big disconnect between the artist and the consumer. The everyday aesthetic that is encoded in art is not appreciated. Society is only concerned with culture, only with art and not with people and their livelihoods. “It’s because you have hierarchies in India. Anything intellectual gets more visibility. We appreciate a certain kind of knowledge that we can showcase and showcase,” she said.

Speaking about his book ‘Kabadiwala’, Sridala said the traditional way of recycling things should be celebrated. “But the people who do never make it into the stories and on the screens and they’re never talked about, often not in a positive way.”

READ ALSO | Can Odia’s literature inspire Odia’s cinema again?

Sridala said that before liberalisation, more diverse stories were being told. There were stories of factory workers and people with different professions. “When you start addressing a particular audience, you hone your storytelling to fit who you perceive the audience to be. But if you don’t get attached to who you imagine your audience to be and write what you want to write, the stories will find their audience regardless.
“We need to give people the right stories. Stories that are about people they (the readers) wouldn’t otherwise meet,” Aparna said in conclusion to the session.

BHUBANESWAR: The time has come for Indian stories and everyone wants to have access to them in English, author and journalist Aparna Karthikeyan said at the 10th Odisha Literary Festival here on Sunday. Join the conversation on ‘Jam Scones or Pani Puri? Do we have enough Indian tales? with poet and author Sridala Swami, Aparna said the translation scene in India is now vibrant and as a result more Indian stories are available in English. Indian stories are mostly about everyday events. “But do we have enough space to report these events in popular media?” she asked. For Aparna, there is a big disconnect between the artist and the consumer. The everyday aesthetic that is encoded in art is not appreciated. Society is only concerned with culture, only with art and not with people and their livelihoods. “It’s because you have hierarchies in India. Anything intellectual gets more visibility. We appreciate a certain kind of knowledge that we can showcase and showcase,” she said. Speaking about his book ‘Kabadiwala’, Sridala said the traditional way of recycling things should be celebrated. “But the people who do never make it into the stories and on the screens and they’re never talked about, often not in a positive way.” READ ALSO | Can Odia’s literature inspire Odia’s cinema again? Sridala said that before liberalisation, more diverse stories were being told. There were stories of factory workers and people with different professions. “When you start addressing a particular audience, you hone your storytelling to fit who you perceive the audience to be. But if you don’t get attached to who you imagine your audience to be and write what you want to write, the stories will find their audience regardless. “We need to give people the right stories. Stories that are about people they (the readers) wouldn’t otherwise meet,” Aparna said in conclusion to the session.